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Growing old

angelone

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I'm 56 and I wonder what's next? I survived the AIDS "Stanlingrad" but living with the memories of the wild seventies and eighties has made me more aware of my mortality than ever. Guys/gals what do you do with old age coming upon like a unwanted wet rag on your face? :confused1:
 
Fascinating question Angelone and one that has also recently crossed my mind. I am 57 so I only out rank you by one year but that is only in chronological years. When you add my health index in there I must be well over a hundred. In the last two years I have gone from being fully active and mobile to now being on total disability and spending my time roaming aimlessly around the house in an electric wheel chair. All the while being constantly reminded of all the things I used to be able to do. What I miss the most is working on my airplane that I was building when things went to hell. A young friend of mine told me a story the other day about how he found out he was Bi. It was a heart warming story that I may share with the forum some day. It was wonderful to hear how toughing my young friend’s day of discovery was. But it was also very bitter sweet as it made me realize that my days of young romance have long passed. I will never again be allowed to sample the sweet tender lips of adolescence. As for the future I have tried to set myself a goal to be a bit more mobile by next summer. This young friend of mine turns 21 and we are both looking forward to going together to the local clubs which I miss so dearly. So who knows, maybe with a little work and perseverance this old dog may not be dead yet. :w00t:
 
Ah Angelone and Denny Bear have touched on the "dirty little secret", that we don't want to acknowledge. I am the "Daddy" of this group, so far, as I reached the 'Big 60' last June, but I hardly feel like it.

I think of myself as somewhere between 15-25 in my mind, but the mirror tells me otherwise, but I tend to accept things for what they are, as we have no choice over our age.

And I've also discovered that there are young guys who are actually into guys my age. Three weeks ago, a 24 year old guy who I met last June came to visit me for the fourth time, so he must like what I do to him. He is extremely good looking, with a fit tight, semi muscular body. He identifies himself as being straight, lives with his girlfriend, but loves what I do to him with my mouth, better than how she takes care of him.

As long as I can encounter an occasional young guy like him, who enjoys having "Daddy" suck his "boy cock" for him from time to time, and as long as I stay healthy and feel good, then getting old isn't all that bad. A guy like him, along with good friends, and a supportive family, makes life still fun. Add in my interests in "my" sports teams, and entertainment which I enjoy, as well as good porn, like this site when the models are "my type" too, then life is still good.

But like I said, we can obsess on it as a negative, or accept it as a given, and deal with it. For now I choose the latter option. :thumbup:
 
Progressively older and progressively wiser too!

Ah Angelone and Denny Bear have touched on the "dirty little secret", that we don't want to acknowledge. I am the "Daddy" of this group, so far, as I reached the 'Big 60' last June, but I hardly feel like it.

I think of myself as somewhere between 15-25 in my mind, but the mirror tells me otherwise, but I tend to accept things for what they are, as we have no choice over our age.

And I've also discovered that there are young guys who are actually into guys my age. Three weeks ago, a 24 year old guy who I met last June came to visit me for the fourth time, so he must like what I do to him. He is extremely good looking, with a fit tight, semi muscular body. He identifies himself as being straight, lives with his girlfriend, but loves what I do to him with my mouth, better than how she takes care of him.

As long as I can encounter an occasional young guy like him, who enjoys having "Daddy" suck his "boy cock" for him from time to time, and as long as I stay healthy and feel good, then getting old isn't all that bad. A guy like him, along with good friends, and a supportive family, makes life still fun. Add in my interests in "my" sports teams, and entertainment which I enjoy, as well as good porn, like this site when the models are "my type" too, then life is still good.

But like I said, we can obsess on it as a negative, or accept it as a given, and deal with it. For now I choose the latter option. :thumbup:

Dear fellow teenagers and AARP members,

As we sit somewhat humbled by our ever growing nose, expanding gut, silver toned body hair sprouting here and there, and having coarse hair sprouting anew from our nose, ears, eyebrows, and most assuredly the much anticipated and long overdue palm hair, fret not as we all are the fortunate survivors. At 62 I have the comfort of knowing that my mind is still every bit as young (and probably as horny) as I allow it to be. Physical limitations, heretofore unknown by those in their 20's or 30's, are just a further enriching of our appreciation for life. Regardless of your religious affiliation or non-affiliation, some ever powerful life force has gotten us all to this point and through near brushes with the abyss. We can all attest to the positive fact that we are here today, paying taxes and subscribing to Broke Straight Boys Our weathered minds are replete with beautiful images of gorgeous young men we may or may never have had the luxury to actually caress or feel their beautiful lips innocently brush up against our own lips. We may never get to loose ourselves in their silky smooth skin or their uniquely beautiful sexual accoutrements be they "hairy" or "completely clean shaven". Yet, each of us have had our own unique brush with real life and the fragrent realization of something wonderfully alive and warm in our presence.

While I to have physical limitations previously unknown, I prefer to view them as challenges to one's strength of character, endurance, and most essentially testing of one's basic survival skills. I don't view any of us as fallen victims to advancing age, as every human is dealing with this same issue at their own level of development. We are finite at birth and to expect something else is unrealistic. We are not alone in this advancing in this scenario. We each have a purpose and something within us that has yet been fully explored or actualized to the maximum extend. So we can call upon this to faithfully guide us ever forward.

While I love to reminisce about the "good old days" each of us must remember, they are colored with time much like an old newspaper and our memories can either serve us productively to advance us to accept our next challenges head on or doom ourself to some less than hopeful existence. It is, to a large extent, how we choose to view life. Focusing on the negative will only chase away others we might have otherwise been able to hold on to.

Point in case: With the leaving of Undie, this was an immense mental undertaking require much mental gymnastics on both our parts("his" and ours but for me "mine") to fully accept this eventual reality. For the preceding 6 months, we have had the extreme luxury to share in, even vicariously, with the boundless gifts that was bundled up inside the beautiful soul we all know as Undie. The beautiful person he was, was not based upon physical knowledge but, rather, on all that he brought to the table in all of his special postings and threads, pictures, you-tube links, and his enormous appreciation for having fun in life. Far from this, Undie had to have a very kind and loving spirit so very integral to his most basic being at his core. I cannot believe, if one follows the forum, that one current member could possibly claim to be totally unaffected by his influences on the forum and on the lives of many others as well. Life demands social responsibility from us all at whatever age bracket we happen to occupy. Undie had this as demonstrated by his elloquent advise offered to Markymark about his son wanting to post his pictures on the sight

So may we all resolve, irrespective of our current age, to be as young as our hearts yearn to be. It is within each one of us, regardless of the physical limitations or impairments we are each dealing with. We need to learn cross-generationally to appreciate the many wonderous life lessons each person has to contribute and offer us throughout our daily existence on planet earth and relinquish our focus on personal regrets from the past!

Be well and know that we each have love and beauty within us all. It is just wanting the opportunity to express itself. Make sure your Welcome Mat is always prominently displayed at your doorstep!

My blessings and peace go out to all forumites, both young and not so young! Sincerely,


Cumrag27, aka Stimpy
 
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I feel so good right now, having made a major discovery while reading this thread. I now know that I am a certified member of the "tweens", in that I am between 50 and 60, and facing many of the same questions others in this forum are also facing. This whole subject is something I have long wanted to broach, and finally, (thank you Angelone) I can. Your question is simple, "what do we do now?" The answer has as many variables as there are stars in the sky. But I think for my situation, it all comes down to a matter of adaptation. For example if I make a list before I go, then I will only need one trip to the store, saving time, gas and energy, none of which was in short supply when I was young. So, planning ahead has become a new way of life. I have slowed down, but now I see that as an opportunity to do something I never did as a young man; I savor each moment. I place greater value on the people in my life now. Why? Because there are less of them, but their experiences in their own lives, as shared with me, enrich my own. I am not as quick to judge the faults of others, since I have begun to stumble over my own, and find I need more time to evaluate my own mistakes, leaving less time to ponder those of the people around me. I guess in short, I have reached a point where I am finally able to see that there has been growth in wisdom, as well as the chance to use it, whether it is mine, or that of my many 'tween' friends, without whom, I would be a sad and lonely old man.

And one more thing, I know now how incredibly loving and caring my parents were, giving me the direction I needed to get where I am now! I treasure every moment I have left with my mom, wondering at each step, what she will show me next.
 
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You're only as old as the guy you a feeling & at the moment I am feeling 53 ....... oh wait that is me.
 
Mystery now solved

I feel so good right now, having made a major discovery while reading this thread. I now know that I am a certified member of the "tweens", in that I am between 50 and 60, and facing many of the same questions others in this forum are also facing. This whole subject is something I have long wanted to broach, and finally, (thank you Angelone) I can. Your question is simple, "what do we do now?" The answer has as many variables as there are stars in the sky. But I think for my situation, it all comes down to a matter of adaptation. For example if I make a list before I go, then I will only need one trip to the store, saving time, gas and energy, none of which was in short supply when I was young. So, planning ahead has become a new way of life. I have slowed down, but now I see that as an opportunity to do something I never did as a young man; I savor each moment. I place greater value on the people in my life now. Why? Because there are less of them, but their experiences in their own lives, as shared with me, enrich my own. I am not as quick to judge the faults of others, since I have begun to stumble over my own, and find I need more time to evaluate my own mistakes, leaving less time to ponder those of the people around me. I guess in short, I have reached a point where I am finally able to see that there has been growth in wisdom, as well as the chance to use it, whether it is mine, or that of my many 'tween' friends, without whom, I would be a sad and lonely old man.

And one more thing, I know now how incredibly loving and caring my parents were, giving me the direction I needed to get where I am now! I treasure every moment I have left with my mom, wondering at each step, what she will show me next.

Dear Markymark,

I think of all of the adaptability required to function in these times when people, even a generation before, could not conceive of the technological innovations that are just a routine part of our daily existence now. This would have been considered sheer folly not so long ago.

I especially appreciate your recognition of and appreciation for the love afforded by our previous generation as this becomes more apparent each day as we mature more. As a youth or even someone in my 20's, it was too easy to think things would continue forever and I took things for granted. It is only now as I approach old age that I can see clearly the adaptability of our previously unadaptable parents, viewed from the perspective of a more matured individual. For all the inconveniences they may create, one's parents have many gifts to offer, whether they are still with us or not. Things we felt unforgivable at our earlier age now, through greater understand of the ongoing struggles our parents had in their own lives, makes it easier to forgive and get past those obstacles that held us back.

In my childhood, I personally had a great many difficulties in my relationship with my father. He was a "career" Drill Sergeant in the US Army and a WWII/Korean Conflict veteran, who died in 1963 from leukemia when only 46 and I was just turned 15. Since joining Broke Straight Boys last March, my postings on the forum caused me to revisit our troubled relationship. When viewed from the perspective of today's military men coming back home after war with post-traumatic stress disorder, although not even identified in medical terms at the time of my father's death in 1963, presented me a new and more acceptable reinterpretation on the mystery surrounding my past hurts and his inability to provide me any affection. At the age of 62, I finally came to the realization that this was most probably where he was coming from in 1963 and before, emotionally speaking, and some 60+ years of hurt vaporized in front of me upon acquiring this new but much needed insight.

I am much more at peace now than before first writing on the forum at age 62 of our troubled relationship. His inability to show his love to me as a child made me seek out that loving male influence I so needed as a child, but never found. Mystery now solved after more than a half century.

Further wisdom is a blessing we all can appreciate.

Sincerely,


Stimpy
 
Since joining Broke Straight Boys last March, my postings on the forum caused me to revisit our troubled relationship.......

At the age of 62, I finally came to the realization that this was most probably where he was coming from in 1963 and before, emotionally speaking, and some 60+ years of hurt vaporized in front of me upon acquiring this new but much needed insight.

I am much more at peace now than before first writing on the forum at age 62 of our troubled relationship.
Hey Stimpy, I think that it's very cool that this forum on an Internet "dirty movie" site has provided you with a forum to work out some long suppressed thoughts and feelings going back to your boyhood and adolescence.

I enjoy reading the honest, true emotions, of folks, especially those who have gone through some of the same stuff that I did, whether it involves your relationship with your father, or Smiley's relationship with his boyhood friend, and fellow masturbator, Mike.

I believe that sharing, and speaking truths are very healthy.
 
although i'm just 26 (almost 27), the experiences of my life make me feel much older. with my new job, i fear a quick aging is in my future, but i am very blessed to look much younger than i am. the only advice i can offer on dealing with harsh realities is climb over it. no matter how old you are, you will always be able to conquer anything with the proper mindset. as one of the babies in the group, big hug to the older men.
 
There are few things healthier...

Hey Stimpy, I think that it's very cool that this forum on an Internet "dirty movie" site has provided you with a forum to work out some long suppressed thoughts and feelings going back to your boyhood and adolescence.

I enjoy reading the honest, true emotions, of folks, especially those who have gone through some of the same stuff that I did, whether it involves your relationship with your father, or Smiley's relationship with his boyhood friend, and fellow masturbator, Mike.

I believe that sharing, and speaking truths are very healthy.

Dear Mikeyank,

I agree it seems a bit ironic in that such raw and private emotions have been shared on the forum by myself and others, that is a forum for a "porn site". Maybe more correctly labeled as a "porn site with a socially responsible forum". That just attests to the innate value of our forum and I hope it never is changed. The fact that we all are masturbators to some degree, doesn't mean that sharing a most common experience though personalized to someone's first time, for example, doesn't have value.

When Undie created the thread and wrote on his "Where did you make yourself first cum" about his first masturabtory experience, he indicated that he had never ever shared this event with anyone. Not wishing to appear critical, but can you imagine holding this most common of experiences secret for some 12 years afterwards and the freeing sensation of being able to openly discuss this moment in time without being fearful of ridicule and just as another basic fact of life. That is the value of our forum. I sincerely feel the more that we become transparent through sharing our personal experiences, the more we grow towards self-acceptance and self-assurance. Taboos from the past onlt clutter up our mind when we could be better served by dealing with the present.

In conclusion, Mikeyank, I have to 2nd your opinion when you say "I believe that sharing, and speaking truths are very healthy". You couldn't be more correct! And for those who simply cannot bring themself to share their own personal experiences on the forum, at least they can profit by reading the experiences of other peers with the ultimate hope that they too will become comfortable enough with themself to share in the future on the forum.

Thanks for Sharing, Mikeyank,

Sincerely,


Stimpy
 
I too am facing the downhill slide to old age. I came out rather late in life at age 45. Now nine years later I regret not seeking a relationship. As with most guys I know, I did the whole "kid in the candy store" routine for at least the first six years. Don't get me wrong, I enjoyed every minute of it. I just wish I had realized the fact that the older I was getting the less "marketable" I became. My biggest fear for old age is going through it alone. I want someone to love that loves me back, and to be by my side, as I would for him, through thick and thin.

I have a number of young friends all in their early to late twenties. I love them to death and they love me as well in a parental sort of way I think. Until recently I was able to go out on the town with these youngsters and hold my own. Not so much anymore.

I want a do-over at life!! LOL!
 
Yes demands from our jobs can be most daunting

although i'm just 26 (almost 27), the experiences of my life make me feel much older. with my new job, i fear a quick aging is in my future, but i am very blessed to look much younger than i am. the only advice i can offer on dealing with harsh realities is climb over it. no matter how old you are, you will always be able to conquer anything with the proper mindset. as one of the babies in the group, big hug to the older men.

Dearest zyl84,

I think having a "can do attitude" is the most important attribute in life to possess. But, also, in contrast to your fear of your job aging you, I feel most of us would agree and say this amount of engagement and activity is helping you remain "young and vital". At the other end of the extreme, when you eventually retire and have few friends to share activities with, all that freedom associated with retirement can quickly become your own worst enemy and lead to pre-mature aging because (especially for guys with their less than communicative fathers) you have been preprogrammed to believe your "self-worth comes directly from your job". FALSE ASSUMPTION! FALSE ASSUMPTION!

Once retired, whether voluntarily or otherwise due to health problems or company retirement age policies, your self-worth takes a "big hit" immediately and all of those things you kept on putting off when you were younger, you might not be physically capable of doing after you retire. TRUST ME, THIS REALLY HAPPENS! I KNOW FROM FIRST HAND EXPERIENCE.

So what I am saying to those hard working young individuals is, don't forget to smell the roses in your 20's, 30's, 40's, and 50's as you will never be more capable after you have retired. Often, it is the money that is our first obstacle to smelling these proverbial roses. My mother was from Paris and left her home city after WWII and moved to the US after marrying my father, an American soldier.

I have always had a special love for Paris, although I never had an opportunity to see it first hand. One day when I was 45 (my mother was 79) I was talking with a friend on the phone about on this very topic of visiting Paris, I came to the sudden earth-shattering realization that IT SIMPLY WAS TOO LATE! It was too late for my mother in 1993 and I would never achieve a lifelong dream of seeing Paris through my mother's eyes. This was a crushing blow to my hopes since childhood and it simply was too late for her, based on her health at the time.

In July of 2001, I finally got my dream to visit Paris after we held a memorial service in a small village East of Paris for my mother with her French relatives attending. While I visited the many famous architectural artifacts throughout the city, I know my pilgrimage to Paris on my own, as enjoyable as it was, was significantly lacking without my mother's valued commentary only she could have provided me. As wonderful as the memorial service was bringing my mother's ashes and placing them permanently next to the remains of my grandmother (who died in 1917 at age 27 due to problems during her second pregnancy) and being with our French relatives that loved my mother, all of this I was indeed grateful. Yet it was second best to what could have been a once in a lifetime opportunity to have shared visiting Paris and seeing it through my mother's eyes.

To those younger than me, please don't let your life slip by without first realizing your once in a lifetime opportunities or dreams you have had since childhood. Don't set yourself up focusing myopically so much on your current work demands without figuring in some time for YOURSELF and accomplishing your personal lifelong goals and dreams. Stop what you are doing and get a little perspective on your long-range lifetime goals, while you still have the long-range to plan for.

I am saying all of this lovingly and as your friend as I too wished I had someone to pull me aside and have me forumlate some realistic long-range planning for my life and achieving these worthy goals as well. It may take some additional self-sacrifice on the front end, but your results, when looking back at your life, will more than make up for the initial investment of your time.

Zyl84, I offer you "a big hug from one of the older men" you made reference to and hope you can understand fully where I am coming from! It wasn't that long ago that I was in you same place. You will have plenty of time to age after you retire, this I promise. Now is the time to live life to its fullest, even with all of its distractions, inconveniences, and sacrifices while you still have your health and vitality!


Best Wishes to you, Zyl84, and your peers for a long and meaningful life!


Sincerely,


Stimpy
 
A big "If"...

I too am facing the downhill slide to old age. I came out rather late in life at age 45. Now nine years later I regret not seeking a relationship. As with most guys I know, I did the whole "kid in the candy store" routine for at least the first six years. Don't get me wrong, I enjoyed every minute of it. I just wish I had realized the fact that the older I was getting the less "marketable" I became. My biggest fear for old age is going through it alone. I want someone to love that loves me back, and to be by my side, as I would for him, through thick and thin.

I have a number of young friends all in their early to late twenties. I love them to death and they love me as well in a parental sort of way I think. Until recently I was able to go out on the town with these youngsters and hold my own. Not so much anymore.

I want a do-over at life!! LOL!

Dear Rickster,

What if your age at coming out was 62 or you had to relocate to a place you hadn't resided in for almost 30 years and you have no long term relationships prospects and practically nil for a dependable support group to be there when needed most. I say this to provide you and others a little perspective in relation to my everyday reality.

Ask yourself, who is going to tell the Doctor to "pull the plug", if you suffer some irreparable physical injury to your brain and you become a vegetable kept alive only by machines, having no likely significant human contact other than those hourly personnel in some hospital or nursing home. Right you are that relationships are one's lifeblood in medical emergencies or merely providing "quality of life" issues for your continued existence.

Women seem to have always understood this concept much more readily than "independent men" and women foster long-term relationships throughout their entire life, where as guys seen to have almost a disdain for prolonged friendships. Guys almost universally seem happiest to have a remote control in one hand and a can of beer (or dick) in the other.

WHAT IS WRONG WITH THIS PICTURE? And why are us guys so easily satisfied with so very little? Have the marketing experts so successfully tapped the lowest common denominator in us guys? Do we have to little expectations for significant relationships with other guys? Do we have to low expectations for ourselves?

Unfortunately, we cannot go to Wal-mart and get a "Relationships-R-Us blister-pack" to satisfy our dire needs for a meaningful long-term and loving relationship. I do believe we need to be committed to take as much personal responsibility for our actions as possible, but the rest is mostly a big "If", at best.
  • If we happen to make the right acquaintances,
  • If we invest into showing love, not just sexual attraction, to those individuals that are most capable of providing genuine love in response,
  • If we have the patience, trust, and acceptance to allow love to blossom over the time remaining.
  • If we do all in our power to avoid being a burdon to those who might otherwise have an interest in us.
  • If we are honest with ourself and working on becoming more marketable for long-term relationships, rather than the more available one-night stands.
  • If we continue to be see the world as half-full, rather than half-empty.
  • If we are truly honest with ourself as flawed but making significant improvements. And
  • If we can get beyond the me, me, me and incorporate feelings for others, others, others in it's place.

We all have untapped resources within us regardless of our age, and we must begin to call upon these resources and think outside the box" when it comes to making the necessary human links essential to establish real and loving relationships. Don't let age alone be a factor, but also make sure that your possible partner can have the maturity necessary to understand where exactly you are coming from.

Best of luck to you, Rickster, in solving your relationship issues! You definitely are not alone.


Sincerely,


Stimpy
 
Dearest zyl84,

I think having a "can do attitude" is the most important attribute in life to possess. But, also, in contrast to your fear of your job aging you, I feel most of us would agree and say this amount of engagement and activity is helping you remain "young and vital". At the other end of the extreme, when you eventually retire and have few friends to share activities with, all that freedom associated with retirement can quickly become your own worst enemy and lead to pre-mature aging because (especially for guys with their less than communicative fathers) you have been preprogrammed to believe your "self-worth comes directly from your job". FALSE ASSUMPTION! FALSE ASSUMPTION!

Once retired, whether voluntarily or otherwise due to health problems or company retirement age policies, your self-worth takes a "big hit" immediately and all of those things you kept on putting off when you were younger, you might not be physically capable of doing after you retire. TRUST ME, THIS REALLY HAPPENS! I KNOW FROM FIRST HAND EXPERIENCE.

So what I am saying to those hard working young individuals is, don't forget to smell the roses in your 20's, 30's, 40's, and 50's as you will never be more capable after you have retired. Often, it is the money that is our first obstacle to smelling these proverbial roses. My mother was from Paris and left her home city after WWII and moved to the US after marrying my father, an American soldier.

I have always had a special love for Paris, although I never had an opportunity to see it first hand. One day when I was 45 (my mother was 79) I was talking with a friend on the phone about on this very topic of visiting Paris, I came to the sudden earth-shattering realization that IT SIMPLY WAS TOO LATE! It was too late for my mother in 1993 and I would never achieve a lifelong dream of seeing Paris through my mother's eyes. This was a crushing blow to my hopes since childhood and it simply was too late for her, based on her health at the time.

In July of 2001, I finally got my dream to visit Paris after we held a memorial service in a small village East of Paris for my mother with her French relatives attending. While I visited the many famous architectural artifacts throughout the city, I know my pilgrimage to Paris on my own, as enjoyable as it was, was significantly lacking without my mother's valued commentary only she could have provided me. As wonderful as the memorial service was bringing my mother's ashes and placing them permanently next to the remains of my grandmother (who died in 1917 at age 27 due to problems during her second pregnancy) and being with our French relatives that loved my mother, all of this I was indeed grateful. Yet it was second best to what could have been a once in a lifetime opportunity to have shared visiting Paris and seeing it through my mother's eyes.

To those younger than me, please don't let your life slip by without first realizing your once in a lifetime opportunities or dreams you have had since childhood. Don't set yourself up focusing myopically so much on your current work demands without figuring in some time for YOURSELF and accomplishing your personal lifelong goals and dreams. Stop what you are doing and get a little perspective on your long-range lifetime goals, while you still have the long-range to plan for.

I am saying all of this lovingly and as your friend as I too wished I had someone to pull me aside and have me forumlate some realistic long-range planning for my life and achieving these worthy goals as well. It may take some additional self-sacrifice on the front end, but your results, when looking back at your life, will more than make up for the initial investment of your time.

Zyl84, I offer you "a big hug from one of the older men" you made reference to and hope you can understand fully where I am coming from! It wasn't that long ago that I was in you same place. You will have plenty of time to age after you retire, this I promise. Now is the time to live life to its fullest, even with all of its distractions, inconveniences, and sacrifices while you still have your health and vitality!


Best Wishes to you, Zyl84, and your peers for a long and meaningful life!


Sincerely,


Stimpy


thanks stimpy, i understand what you're saying. my job deals with the darkest of humanity. i work in the forensics field and see the brutality that man can inflict on another. i'm learning to grow a thicker skin, but it's not always easy. i've been in it barely a month (after interning two summers during master's#1, but never had the degree of exposure i do now). i do understand what you're saying and will take it into account.

j'adore paris. je suis jaloux.
 
Growing old is a state of mind and being that should be welcomed and embraced. "Death is only the Beginning." I am on my 15th lifetime on this planet in a physical embodiment. I was offered Ascension a few times before. Much like Quan Yin, The Chinese Goddess of Love and Mercy, (She vowed to wait outside the gates of heaven until all of our souls have crossed) I have chosen to come back and help raise the vibration of humanity as a whole. This physical life time is so short lived and our soul is yet so eternal. From the moment we are born we embark on our path of final destiny in this lifetime. I say with great Love and adoration, let's just sit back and enjoy the ride. In the grand scheme of the life of a soul, those of us living a physical existence, we are still babies in the grand venue of Universal Life. If we don't get it right there will always be another lifetime to live learn and grow. LOL It is not about Force it is about Power. May we all find our inner Power of Divine Love and Universal Wisdom and Truth one day...

Peace and blessings to all. Live long, love much, and grow...:001_smile:
 
Translation: "I adore Paris. I am jealous."

thanks stimpy, i understand what you're saying. my job deals with the darkest of humanity. i work in the forensics field and see the brutality that man can inflict on another. i'm learning to grow a thicker skin, but it's not always easy. i've been in it barely a month (after interning two summers during master's#1, but never had the degree of exposure i do now). i do understand what you're saying and will take it into account.

j'adore paris. je suis jaloux.

Dear Zyl84,

When we corresponded on this "Growing Old" thread, I always intended to ask you about your closing statement. Have you been to Paris before and, if so, what were your experiences while you were there?

My primary purpose of going to Paris, in July of 2001 following my mother's memorial service held with our French relatives, was to get in touch with my roots. I did some of the more typical touristy things, I went to Notre Dame Cathedral, the nearby Sainte-Chappelle (see note below), the Eiffel Tower, Visited the École Militaire where Napoleon body is buried, took a brief trip on a tourist boat down the Seine River and back, etc. Due to my grandmothers early death in 1917 at age 27, my mother was only 3 at that time and it was during WWI. Her father placed her in an orphanage in Paris at the time and she remained there for 10 years in the care of the Sisters that operated the orphanage. Unlike other kids at the orphanage, my grandfather frequently visited her. I wanted to see the orphanage for myself and I had the address before getting to Paris. However, I could not find the street, specifically 140 Rue du Bac.

On my last day in Paris, I was taking the subway to the area where the Bastille had been at the time of the French Revolution. While on the subway, I noticed the next to the last stop before the "Place de la Bastille" was the street name "Rue du Bac" I had been unable to locate it otherwise. I immediately exited at the stop and found the orphanage about two blocks away from this subway stop. I felt very grateful to actually have located the orphanage after all was very moved, even though none of the original buildings were still standing. It was still an orphanage and on its outer gate prominently displayed that one of the Sisters that had worked with the orphanage had been declared a saint, namely St. Catherine of Labouré . Sister Catherine died on December 31, 1876. In 1895 her cause for Beatification was introduced in Rome. She was beatified on May 28, 1933. When her body was exhumed, after fifty-seven years of burial, it was found to be completely incorrupt and supple. This is often one of the outward characteristics of a saint. Catherine was canonized a Saint on July 27, 1947.

My mother often mentioned viewing her body in a glass enclosed case in church at her orphanage as a small child, a seemingly strange custom is observed even today of sainted individuals in the Catholic Church. You can read more about St. Catherine Labouré and the "Miraculous Medal" at this location:

http://www.amm.org/medal.asp


So Zyl84, I am eager to know your experiences or reasons for interest in Paris. I am assuming you have visited Paris before. Please share with me your experiences.


Sincerely,


Stimpy

PLEASE NOTE: Sainte-Chapelle was built in 1246 by France's King Louis IX, is a strikingly beautiful oasis which sits amid gray government buildings of the Palais de Justice and less than two blocks distance from Notre Dame Cathedral. Constructed as part of the King's palace, all that remains today is the two story chapel. The bottom level with no windows was designated for the servants and the upper level with it's wall to wall stain glass windows was designated for Royalty. The primary colors used in its its design are lapis blue and maroon gilded with the Fleur-de-lis, a stylized iris or lily symbol of French Royalty. The distinction of the two royal coat of arms at the bottom on the left is that the top one was used until 1346 and the bottom coat of arms was used after 1346.
 

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I've never been to Paris. When learning French, I learned a lot about the culture and the history behind the country. I am in love with both the culture, architecture and history the country itself has. The language is both beautiful and intricate. The culture is proud and rich. My boyfriend and I want to go on a tour of Europe. We're saving for it now.
 
Zyl, there's nothing like being there--all the books and articles and pictures pale in comparison. And when you do go to Paris, you'll wish you had more than a month to indulge...because you wouldn't be able to see everything even at a break-neck pace. That would be very unFrench as well, because hopefully you'll take your time to enjoy and soak it all in, rather than playing the 'if it's Tuesday it must be Belgium' tourist game. Paris est une ville incomparable--les vues, les sons et les goûts te donneront des expériences riches, les souvenirs d'une vie...
 
Zyl, there's nothing like being there--all the books and articles and pictures pale in comparison. And when you do go to Paris, you'll wish you had more than a month to indulge...because you wouldn't be able to see everything even at a break-neck pace. That would be very unFrench as well, because hopefully you'll take your time to enjoy and soak it all in, rather than playing the 'if it's Tuesday it must be Belgium' tourist game. Paris est une ville incomparable--les vues, les sons et les goûts te donneront des expériences riches, les souvenirs d'une vie...

I completely agree with you. I spent 6 weeks there and still didn't see enough to satisfy my appetite. I hope to return one day with my family. Paris is wonderful. I have to say, though, that I so enjoyed the small villages and the environs that I'd probably spend more time around Paris than in it.... alas, that's also true of most cities I've visited in the US.
 
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